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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
president mohamed morsi and his opponents. outrage aimed at mr. morsi after the announcement of a number of controversial decrees earlier this week that give him sweeping powers. they make him at least temporarily the most powerful man in egypt. also seems to be an effort to push through the all-important drafting of the new constitution and putting in place the formation of egypt's new parliament want. one of the decrees bans anyone, even the judiciary, from appealing, overturning, questioning any decision mr. morsi has made since taking office in june. that order is to be set in place until a new parliament is formed. so technically, he's going to be the most powerful man essentially he can do whatever he wants, without any oversight. that's one of the decrees, john, that has a lot of his opponents describing this as an undemocratic power grab. >> and do these changes affect both his creditics and opponents or just his opponents? >> reporter: well, look. right now, the political landscape favors mr. morsi and his political movement the, the muslim brotherhood, and certainly these decre
to top it will country's long-time dictator hosni mubarak. today mr. morsi's critics clashed with his supporters while police fired tear gas canisters into the crowd. "he's saying that he's our god" said this protester. "he's made a mistake." and this woman said that after marching for freedom the country's ended up with a new dictator. in alexandria, an angry crowd stormed the offices at the muslim brotherhood from which president morsi draws his support. they ransacked the building and then set it on fire. from outside his presidential palace today, mr. morsi addressed the nation. he said the new measures are designed to cut through political gridlock. "it was allah's will that i became the president" he said "and we need to go forward with the new steps, not backwards." but only 52% of egyptians voted for the president. now many of those who didn't worry that mr. morsi wants to stifle democracy and impose his own islamist vision on the country. >> mason: we're joined by holly williams in cairo. holly, given the scale of the protests, is there any sign morsi might change his mind? >
on friday, friday one of the most intense and violent days of demonstrations that we've seen since mr. morsi, the egyptian president took office back in june. more than 140 people injured throughout egypt, according to the health ministry, in clashes between protesters and police. a little under 40 people injured in kay row. several with gunshot wounds. also, more than 200 people arrested and many on charges of thuggery and destroying public property. those arrested seem to be younger men who are out looking for trouble, but certainly thousands showed up to express what they call as legitimate and serious concern about mr. morsi's decrees that at least for the time being give him sweeping powers without any oversight for the next several months. he says these moves are an effort to move forward the democratic process and to draft a constitution. his opponents describe it as an undemocratic power grab, and now this face-off is taking shape. one of mr. morsi's advisers quitting today, the supreme court judicial council, the body that represents the top judges, held an emergency meeting today w
you talk to them they seem determined to speak out against mr. morsi's controversial decrees. >> the beginning avenue era for a tyrant. >> he's saying that nobody can revise what i say. he's actually throwing the new system out of the scene. >> reporter: big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences on saturday where factions posed to mr. morsi made moves to put pressure on the president. of course a number of his decrees seem to weaken the judiciary. the judiciary answered back on saturday by calling for a nationwide judge's strike. also the supreme judicial council on saturday made a statement declaring his decrease an attack on the independence of the judiciary. opposing factions also called for a 1 million man protest and sit in on tuesday. what this mr. morsi's muslim brotherhood group do? they call for a 1 million man protest too on tuesday. some critical days ahead for this country. >>> in this country the hollywood walk of fame is decorated with flowers honoring larry hagman. it is a tribute to the legendary film and television actor who tied yesterday at a h
mr. morsi's controversial decrees. >> the beginning of a new era for a tyrant. >> he's saying nobody can revise what i say. he's actually throwing the system out of the scene totally. >> reporter: big developments in meeting rooms and news conferences on saturday where factions opposed to mr. morsi made moves to put pressure on the president. of course, a number of his decrees seemed to weaken the judiciary. the judiciary answered back on saturday by calling for a nationwide judges strike. also the supreme judicial council on saturday made a statement declaring his decrees an attack on the independenc of the judiciary. opposing factions also called for a 1 million-man protest and sit-in on tuesday. what does mr. morsi's muslim brotherhood group do? they call for a 1 million-man protest, too, on tuesday. critical days ahead for this country. reza sayah, cnn, cairo. >> let's give you a look at tahrir square live coming in via satellite. it's just after 5:30 in the morning. egypt's state-run news service reports that 261 people have been injured in the clashes around the country. 43 peo
and protesters. tear gas. and we're moving away. >> as the protests incentensify mr. morsi appealed for calm in a speech to hundreds of his supporter who gathered outside the presidential palace in cairo. he defended accusations of a power grab. >> translator: i didn't take a decision against anyone. i have to put myself in a clear path, a path that acheieves a clear goal. >> several hours after his speech, his critics were still out here in tahrir square, protesting throughout the night, setting the stage for what seems to be an intensifying faceoff between the president and his opponents. >> and ressa is joining us live now in tahrir square or near it. is there any indication that president morsi is hearing this sentiment and is in any way indicating that he is willing to kind of revise that new order he put into place? >> no, no indication that he's going to back down, but protesters and opposing factions don't look like they're backing down either. we know the protests and the demonstrations are happening. today what we saw is a number of moves and meeting rooms and decisions announced i
judicial counsel. of course, the judges locking horns with mr. morsi right after one of his decrees essentially disabled them. so they're talking. we're going to see what the outcome of that meeting is. in the meantime, the leading factions, leading opposition factions continue to protest behind us in tahrir square. these factions that represent women's rights groups, youth groups, minorities, their position so far has been we're not going to talk to mr. morsi until he reverses his decrees. we spoke to one of mr. morsi's top advisers earlier today. we asked him if that was a possibility. >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make? >> this decision is up to the president for us. >> is it possible to rescind his decrees? >> we have had a dialogue. >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president and we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step to forward, not to backward. >> reporter: as you heard, we pressed them on the why reasonable degree idea of the president
demonstrators filing into tahrir square and other egyptian cities, aiming their anger at mr. morsi, seems very similar to last year, of course. last year the anger was aimed at mr. mubarak. the demonstrators managed to topple him. today, victor, very similar slogans and chants, chants of leave, leave, leave, chants of we won't leave until this government leaves. the same things, the same things we heard last year and now it looks like these demonstrators, just like 2011, are going to do a sit-in. they're putting up stents, look for this to continue for the coming hours. maybe through the weekend, victor. >> we take this a step further now, reza. the only reason that mohamed morsi was able to take power was because he was elected after the people of egypt decided they were done with centralized power with the mubarak government. why do you think he took this step? what motivated this power grab? >> reporter: well, he won't describe it as a power grab. his opponents are describing it as a power grab. but his position, the muslim brotherhood, which is his movement, their position is they want to
cases brought against the controversial decrees declared by mr. morsi last week. here's where the intrigue comes in. last week one of his decrees banned anyone, any authority, even the judiciary from questioning and overturning any of his decisions since he took office. we'll see how that plays out. meantime protests continue. there doesn't seem to be a resolution to this conflict. the leaders of the opposition factions have dug in saying we're not going to have dialogue until mr. morsi rescinds his decrees. a few hours ago we spoke to one of his top advisers and we asked him, is that a possibility? >> what kind of concessions are you willing to make. >> this decision is up to the president, not for us. >> is it possible -- is it possible he will rescind his decrees. >> dialogue with our -- >> are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of these decrees? >> decree is up to the president. we are accepting it. we may have some reservations. but as a whole we must take a step to -- forward, not to backward. >> reporter: that was one of the top advisers for mr. morsi.
where we were before. >> brown: among the protestors in cairo were two men who ran against mr. morsi-- hamdin sabbahi from the leftist al- karamah party, and constitution party founder mohamed el- baradei, who tweeted yesterday that morsi had appointed himself "a new pharaoh." in his decree, morsi also held out the possibility of a second trial for hosni mubarek for the killings of protestors. >> suarez: to explain why morsi took these steps and the reaction that followed, i'm joined by nathan brown, an expert on egyptian constitutional law and politics. he's a professor at george washington university. do you find it significant that this wasn't just tahrir square but alexandria, port said. >> oh, yes. essentially most of the non-islammist political forces in egypt-- that is the brotherhood and others aside-- have lined up against us. the real question is are they going to be able to form a united front? and do they have any strategy by which to overturn morsi's decisions. >> suarez: what exactly has he done through these decrees? what did he say-- what powers did he give to himself
in opposition against mr. morsi. many of them want mr. morsi to step aside. others want him to reverse his decree. but the reason we have a standoff is that mr. morsi, the president, has given no indication that he's going to back down from these decrees, wolf. >> reza sayah in cairo watching this story. very tense situation over there at tahrir square right now. elsewhere in the middle east today they exhumed the body of the palestinian leader i can't say er arafat, they're trying to clear up a mystery. did somebody try to kill him with poison? i always wait until the last minute. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. by december 22nd [ female announcer ] some people like to pretend a flood could never happen to them. and that their homeowners insurance protects them. [ thunder crashes ] it doesn't. stop pretending. only flood insurance covers floods. ♪ visit floodsmart.gov/pretend to learn your risk. >>> the lat
this is unacceptable. we thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a ceasefire, which, by the way, is incredibly fragile. but this is not acceptable. and our dollars will be related to the progress of democracy which he promised the people of egypt. oot muslim brotherhood and president morsi's opponents in cairo on tuesday ahead of those planned protests. today morsi will meet with the country's top judges in the hopes of solving this crisis. nbc's ayman joins us now. instead of the leader whose letter begins with 346 but it's not mubarak we're talking about, it's morsi. what's going on today? >> reporter: well, you're right. that's what the people here in tahrir square have been telling us, that they've replaced one dictator for another and, in fact, you can't really emphasize this enough. it's all about a domino effect here in egypt. let's start with the most developing news and that is a cairo court has agreed to hear a lawsuit by 60 lawyers for that decree he issued on thursday. this is precisely the problem morsi says he is facing day in and day out. every time he tries to take a decision,
the scene for us this morning and how important mr. morsi is in the solution we see here. >> reporter: yeah, christine, this is another critical day in this conflict. a lot of people anxious to see what happens in the coming hours. it's a little after 12:00 noon cairo time and in a couple of hours secretary clinton is scheduled to arrive in cairo meeting with the egyptian president mohammad morsi as well as the arab league. whenever big conflicts happen in the middle east, washington wants to be seen as playing a major role as peacemaker. that is clearly why mrs. clinton is in the region today, but it is also clear that throughout the past few days it's been egypt that's taking the lead as peacemaker. obviously, they have strong links to hamas and they also have links with israel with that peace treaty they have promised to abide by. so they seem to be logical peacemaker. yesterday they were optimistic that a cease-fire would be established. mr. morsi says he expects the aggression to stop. obviously, christine, that didn't happen. heavy fighting throughout the night and the early morning h
of the opposition faction continue to demand mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. we just spoke to one of his senior advisers a couple of hours ago. he wants dialogue with the leading opposition factions. he didn't say anything about these decrees today. there are talks scheduled with the judges. but at this hour, no talks scheduled with the opposition factions. tomorrow big protests on both sides. both the opposing factions and mr. morsi the muslim brotherhood calling for 1 million man protests. >> interesting timing, of course, as they try to negotiate some kind of a peace treaty there or at least continuing relation of talks with the peace talks reza sayah for us. >>> holiday shoppers in full force through black friday. did you go shopping, christine? >> heck no. have you read my book, soledad? don't spend money you don't have. >> 247, that's a record, 247 million? >> it is a record number but it's stretched out over four days now. now the days are thursday through sunday. let me throw in cyber monday, right, so it all comes together in huge, huge four-day frenzy of buying. >> total spending of w
square in central cairo. mr. morsi is make iing a politi gamble that most people here will vote for a constitution that represents his own more conservative views but in doing so he has infuriated many other egyptians. for "cbs this morning," holly williams, cairo. >>> back here in the united states, many people up and down the west coast are keeping a close eye on a triple threat of storms. northern california is getting drenched this morning. and forecasters say even worse weather is yet to come. carter evans is in soggy sacramento. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. right now much of northern california is under a flood warning. this is the second of three major storms to hit the area. and already overnight here in sacramento, we've seen up to 2 1/2" of rainfall. this is the storm northern california has been bracing for. forecasters say this downpour has the potential for widespread damage. >> friday is going to be bad. sunday is going to be even worse. >> reporter: here is why californians are worried. it's not a single storm but a one, two, three punch. increasing th
the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israel. but the problem is, washington does not have a relationship with hamas. the u.s. sees hamas as a terrorist group, of course. i think that's where egypt could play a significant role here. look for secretary clinton to push egypt, its president, mohamed morsi, to get hamas to make some concessions to possibly hammer out a cease fire. yesterday egyptian officials were optimistic that a cease fire would come. today, it's not the case. all parties here seem to be continuing the push to hammer out some sort of truce while the
. >> as the protests intensified, mr. morsy asked for calm. for those that gathered out of the pal lace, he defended hits decrees and defended accusations of a power grab. >> translator: i didn't take a decision against anyone or pick a side against another. i have to put myself in a clear bath, a path that achiefs a clear goal. >> it's now after midnight, and pockets of clashes continue around tahrir square, and many of the demonstrators are pitching tents, an indication the demonstrations could continue through the weekend. >>> only two days ago, secretary of state hillary clinton was praising the egyptian government for it's leadership in bringing stability and peace to the east. let's go to dan lothian. >> reporter: there is concern about too much power in the hands of one man. he played a key role in that cease fire, he developed what one official says is a relationship of trust with president obama, but as we know with every relationship, things can get complicated. >> at the white house, a sense of calm, kicking off the holiday season with the arrival of a 19 foot christmas tree. >> it is per
? >> dialogue. >> reporter: they want dialogue. they want concessions. they want mr. morsi to rescind his decrees. what kind of concessions are you willing to make? . >> the decision is up to the president. not up to us. we are ready for dialogue with our -- >> reporter: are you prepared to consider rescinding, adjusting some of those decrees? >> decree is up to the president, accepting it -- we may have some reservations. but as a whole, we must take a step forward, not backward. >> reporter: so two big headlines coming out of egypt today, first off, president morsi not scaling back his decrees, sticking with them and the muslim brotherhood calling off their 1 million-man demonstration scheduled for tomorrow. >> we'll have a lot more on this story coming up later this hour. thanks very much, reza sayah, from cairo. >>> other news we're following, including news from afghanistan as the united states looks to wind down its troop strength in afghanistan, plans are being made for a u.s. military force to stay on there even after the 2014 handover to afghan authorities. our pentagon correspon
with mubarak. we are going to oust him. >> now today mr. morsi and the muslim brotherhood are scheduled to meet with the judges, the supreme judicial council, that's one of the groups that his decrees undermine. the problem is, there is no dialogue to get to the leaders of some of the other oppositions. >> and more than $4 billion as well and the judges are threatening to strike. so even with all of that, no decision for morsi to revoke that decree? >> well, we just spoke to one of his senior advisers, and he seemed to suggest that he might consider it, but many will say that if he backs up, it would be a politically wrong move for him. that it will be a sign of weakness. for now, there are no indications from his office that he wants to reverse the decree. >> and reza, just as we were going on air israel's defense minister ehud barak resigned. how could this affect today's talks between israel and hamas? >> it's not clear how ehud barak's resignation is going to impact these talks. but i doubt these talks are going to fall apart the decision for a cease-fire last week were made by the top offi
a summit monday night to call on egypt's president morsi. he then took a call from morsi at 2:30 in the morning, calling again while flying home from cambodia monday night. and in separate calls to netanyahu, mr. obama pressured each to accept, while promising more money for iron dome and other missile defense programs clinton sealed the deal, next went to jerusalem and finally cairo. for final talks with egypt's leaders. nbc's jim maceda has more. >> reporter: morsi, the former muslim brotherhood leader has boosted his credibility with u.s. and israel, and has become a politician to deal with in the arab world but it is one thing to broker a cease-fire, now he will have to enforce it and crack down on hamas and their weapons smuggling >> reporter: president obama who visited israel as a candidate four years ago but not since has to decide his next steps. >> the first thing he has to do is decide whether or not he is going to invest in the effort to resolve the israeli-palestinian conflict. i think at the moment it is a stain on his legacy. >> reporter: the u.s. officials are
president morsi, closed the deal as this official said. they also praised secretary clinton saying that she did an exceptional job. but again going back to what they are saying as mr. obama was very directly involved. one of the things also, wolf, that they're pointing at that i think will prove to be very important is this burgeoning relationship with the egyptian president morsi. i mean, just think of it. just a short time ago he was the new man on the block, muslim brotherhood, lots of doubts about him. and now look at the words that the president used. there's a lot of praise for his personal role in bringing about this cease-fire. that could go a long way. in fact, they say that he was very pragmatic. that's president morsi, very pragmatic. they developed a relationship they say based on trust and were able to work through these issues. so down the road that's going to be important, wolf. >> basically the bottom line in all of this is that the u.s. is also, jill, provided some assurances to both the israeli government of prime minister netanyahu and the egyptian government of president
, secretary clinton did call the foreign minister of egypt, mr. amr, and tried to get some clarification. they discussed this not only this political issue of president morsi, but the issue of gaza, where he played a very important role, and that is why secretary clinton was in that region, just last week. but the -- there is concern and let's listen to what the spokesperson for the state department, victoria newland, had to say about it. >> it is a very murky uncertain period in terms of the legal and constitutional underpinnings, which makes it all the more important that the process proceed on the basis of democratic dialogue and consultation. >> so if it is murky, they are watching it very, very closely. in fact, one thing that victoria nuland said, the right people are talking to each other. that's good news. they want this to happen, number one, peacefully, and number two, democratically. and, you know, brooke, on another issue that funding the imf, of course, just reached an agreement with egypt on some badly needed funds that they needed, and there is a question also here in the
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)